In the beginning of the 60’s, the International Coffee Organization (ICO) established an identity code for each exporting country that, followed by the exporters code and the loading/shipping number, is stamped since then in each bag of coffee. As a small tribute to the history of the bag of coffee, Cafés El Magnífico wants to contribute perpetuating this traditional numeration.
GUATEMALA EL CARPINTERO
Origin
El Carpintero
Francisco Morales
Huehuetenango
Caserio Cipresales
1.550 – 1.675 masl
Caturra and Bourbon
Washed
0.26 € / cup

GUATEMALA EL CARPINTERO

From 8,00 to 32,00

Clear
COFFEE CUP COST AT HOME
Do you know what it costs you a quality coffee prepared at home?
Using 8 grs. (customary measure) drink a cup of this extraordinary coffee for 0.26 €.
THE FARM
Francisco Morales is the second generation of his family that reaps coffee at Caserio Cipresales in the Huehuetenango region, Guatemala.

It owns this farm El Carpintero call that name because it contains many woodpeckers. Before the harvest begins Francisco makes sure that everything is ready by cleaning the harvesting equipment and calibrating the pulper so as not to damage the cherries. In this year's harvest, El Carpintero cherries were picked in four countries to ensure that only the ripe ones are selected.

PROCESSING METHOD
These are taken to the pulper and classified by density. Once the pulp is removed, the grains are placed in fermentation tanks for 36 hours. Then they pass through water corridors to finish removing the mucilage and soak again, for 12 hours.

Concluded this phase, the coffee is dried in patios for 5 days or under shade for 9 days to reach 11% humidity.
PROCESS
These are taken to the pulper and classified by density. Once the pulp is removed, the grains are placed in fermentation tanks for 36 hours. Then they pass through water corridors to finish removing the mucilage and soak again, for 12 hours.

Concluded this phase, the coffee is dried in patios for 5 days or under shade for 9 days to reach 11% humidity.
CUPPING NOTES
Apricot, pastry and chocolate with almonds fragrance. Chestnut and sweet potato aroma. Clean body, pineapple acidity and chocolate with milk flavor.
ORIGIN
While coffee arrived in Guatemala at the end of the eighteenth century, as in most of the colonies of Central and South America, its cultivation began to gain strength in the 1860s, with the arrival of European immigrants encouraged by the Guatemalan government to establish plantations.

Seeds and coffee cuttings were distributed as a stimulus, as the country's main export crop (indigo) had recently failed, leaving the population somewhat desperate to find an agricultural replacement. At the end of the 19th century, Guatemala exported more than 140 tons of coffee a year. Until 2011, it was among the five largest coffee producers in the world, although in recent years has been surpassed by Honduras.

A large percentage of Guatemala's population, and therefore also the coffee sector, identifies with one of the more than 20 officially recognized indigenous groups, and most farmers are small coffee growers who work independently or are formally affiliated in cooperative associations.

In 1960, coffee growers developed their own union, which has since become the National Coffee Institute Anacafé, a research center, marketing agent and financial organization that offers loans and offers support to producers of the different regions.

The coffee of Ceiba comes from the renowned region of Huehuetenango famous for its cascading mountains, lush vegetation, high altitudes, dense forests and, of course, the quality and diversity of its coffees.

Thanks to the hot and dry winds blowing in the mountains of the Tehuantepec plain, Mexico, the region is protected from frost, allowing the highlands of Huehuetenango to be cultivated at up to 2.000 meters.

The extreme remoteness of Huehuetenango practically requires that all producers process their own cherries. Fortunately, the region has an almost infinite number of rivers and streams, so a mill can be placed almost anywhere.